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  INGREDIENTS

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  GLASSWARE

  BARWARE

  DICTIONARY


  HISTORY

  ABOUT ALCOHOL


shot glass
Shot Glass
highball glass
Highball Glass
old-fashioned glass
Old Fashioned Glass
collins glass
Collins Glass


martini glass
Martini (cocktail) Glass
margarita glass
Margarita Glass
pilsner glass
Pilsner Glass
Irish Coffee glass
Irish Coffee Glass


pousse glass
Pousse
brandy snifter glass
Brandy Snifter
punch cup glass
Punch Cup
Cordial Glass
Cordial Glass


white wine glass
White Wine Glass
Red Wine glass
Red Wine Glass
sherry glass
Sherry Glass
Champagne Flute
Champagne Flute


Parfait glass
Parfait Glass
Sour glass
Sour Glass



History of making glassware:
The first glass was made by volcanoes, and was used by early man. Volcanic obsidian has been broken into sharp implements, chipped into decorations and later melted to form beads, bottles and bowls.

In Egypt and Mesopotamia, well before the age of metals, glass was manufactured from raw materials. Glass bottles were found in the tomb of Thutmose I of Egypt. These bottles were less than give inches tall, blue with yellow threads of glass applied to the outside as a decoration. Those ancient people discovered some of the colorants that are used today: cobalt (blue), copper (green), and magnesium (purple).

Glass was as much in demand as gemstones and was often used as a substitute for gems in objects of art. Around 300 B.C., the Greek learned to use a blowpipe to make larger and more useful vessels. In another 100 years the Romans made plate glass for mosaics and wall decorations. They used a mold to contain and shape the blown glass. Later the Romans made cameo glass, worth more than gold and jewels at the time. (Source: Anchor Hocking)

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